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H.A.L.T.

Now, typically, when we talk about entrepreneurship, it’s all about hustling, grinding, and pushing yourself to the limit. It’s about going hard, getting things done, and never giving up. My first book, “Hustle, Struggle, Grind: The 13 Lessons of Life,” was all about that mindset, and I love it.

But over the years, I’ve realized the importance of self-care. Taking care of yourself is not a sign of weakness; it’s a sign of wisdom. When you invest in yourself, you become a better version of you, which benefits not only yourself but also those around you and your team.

Today, we’re going to delve into the concept of self-care. It’s a three-step process: self-awareness, self-regulation, and self-reflection. Self-awareness helps you understand who you are and how you show up in the world. Self-regulation is about managing yourself in the present moment. And self-reflection involves looking back at your past actions to become your best self.

Let’s focus on the times when you weren’t your best self. We often hear about our successes, the moments when we were in the flow, when everything clicked. But what about the times when we failed ourselves and those around us? Let’s address that.

I want to introduce you to an interesting concept I learned during my military career – HALT, which stands for Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired. These are common triggers for not being your best self. When you’re experiencing one or more of these, it can lead to a cascade of negative emotions like helplessness, hopelessness, despair, depression, and imposter syndrome.

Hungry isn’t just about physical hunger; it’s also about mind hunger, eye hunger, and heart hunger. You need intellectual stimulation, new experiences, and physical activity to nourish different aspects of your being.

Anger and anxiety are powerful emotions that can be fueled by past events or future worries. When you feel angry, ask yourself why and what you can do about it. Shifting from a victim mindset to a proactive one can make a world of difference.

Loneliness is a feeling that can creep up even in a crowded room. Identify who recharges you, who truly makes you feel seen and heard. Spend time with those who energize you rather than draining you.

Finally, tiredness is a straightforward issue. Listen to your body, push through when necessary, but also set boundaries and rest when you need it. Your productivity can be optimized when you’re on, but make sure to switch off when you’re done.

Remember, only about 1% of humans can operate on less than six hours of sleep, so prioritize rest. Think about the boundaries you need to establish to prevent burnout.

Incorporating these insights into your daily life can help you become the best version of yourself. Embrace the struggle, learn to navigate through HALT, and reflect on your actions. It’s not just theory; it’s a practical approach to self-care.

And if you want to dive deeper into these concepts, check out my book, “Words Fucking Matter,” available on Amazon and my website. It’s all about retraining your brain to use language that serves you better.

Thanks for joining me in my flow today. Whether you’re an extrovert or an introvert, find what energizes you, and do more of it. Identify what drains your energy and work on eliminating, delegating, or automating those tasks. You have the power to choose whether you want to be in the flow or stuck in the cycle of negativity.

I appreciate your company on this journey. If you want to explore these concepts further, check out my book and stay tuned for more next week. Until then, take care of yourself and make self-care a priority.

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Andy’s door is open. Contact for questions, business inquiries, or veteran support.

Andy Weins

Andy Weins is a fourth-generation entrepreneur, Veteran of the U.S. Army, and speaker. Through consulting, teaching, podcasting, and writing, he is an enthusiastic supporter of Veterans, entrepreneurs, community engagement, individual empowerment, and the environment.

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